The Microsoft Silverlight Review

Written by Henry Young. Posted in Microsoft

Microsoft Silverlight integrates futures and properties that are similar to those of Adobe Flash. It is used for running and writing Internet applications and it can support graphics, multimedia, animation, development tools and CLI languages. Furthermore, it represents one of the two application development platforms that were created for Windows Phone. However, in order to find out more about the pros and the cons of this framework, you have to read this Microsoft Silverlight review.

One of the advantages that the Silverlight can offer to the users is that instead of having to manage with the complexity of multiple browsers, they can target a single runtime for applications which are browser-based. Therefore, the developers can enjoy video and multimedia effects which are impossible to get with pure JavaScript and HTML. This application also allows you to use the Execute.NET without having to deploy the .Net runtime.

Although the Silverlight integrates a .NET runtime, you don’t have to deal with the complexities featured by the Windows installer, nor with a large download since the 4MB download is handled within the browser. So, installation is very easy and smooth. Due to the JIT compilation to native code, the Silverlight application comes out great in a prime number calculator, so it promises a high performance. However, it may not function so great for rendering graphics.

While Adobe features an XML GUI language that is converted at compiling time, the Silverlight operates XAML directly. Moreover, XAML pages are incorporated as sources in the compiled .XAP binary, which is a ZIP file, with other extension used to deploy Silverlight applications. So, text can be indexed within such an application by the search engines. However, if you want to make an accurate Microsoft Silverlight review that can help you understand more about how this application functions, you must know that it also includes some disadvantages. One of them refers to the lack of support on mobile devices. The Apple Company doesn’t even allow Flash on the iPhone, which means that Silverlight doesn’t stand a chance to be supported by such devices.

Another aspect that users might not like is that they need to use two separate tools in order to achieve compatibility between Visual Studio and Expression Blend. Furthermore, these tools might register certain incompatibilities, especially in the current beta. This Microsoft Silverlight review also reflects the fact that it doesn’t support popular video codecs like H.264. Instead, the hi-def video must be VC-1, which people don’t use very often.